MOMENT OF GIVING

Help dying kids to fulfill their last wish

Doing so does a lot, not only with the dying child itself, but also with the helpers all around.

Our charity mission

We help dying children to fulfill their final last big heart’s desire!

When children are dying, this is the greatest possible catastrophe for the family.
Not only for the child concerned, but also for the whole family.
Of course we can’t save dying children!
But with a lot of heart and experience we can offer
the dying child something great:

the fulfillment of the last great heart wish

How do we do this?

As individual as the dying child wants it to be

We do not work in a quiet chamber and certainly not according to a fixed scheme, but are guided by the child’s heart’s desire.
We are accompanied by the family of the dying child, the medical staff and the necessary helpers.

Together they search and find a way to fulfill one last wish. And as a conductor, the dying child who tells us what’s great and what’s not.

In many cases we are supported by an outside, generous person who has decided to act here and now and make something possible that would otherwise not be possible.

And sometimes – when this generous person is part of the fulfillment of the last heart’s desire – incredible friendships arise, which are short but immensely intense and enriching. Mutually. And for all time.

In many cases we are supported by an outside, generous person who has decided to act here and now and make something possible that would otherwise not be possible.

And sometimes – when this generous person is part of the fulfillment of the last heart’s desire – incredible friendships arise, which are short but immensely intense and enriching. Mutually. And for all time.

Why are we doing this?

Those shining eyes, that hearty laugh, that firm hug,
that sigh, that incredible gratitude

Accompanying dying children is incredibly difficult.
To fulfill her last heart’s desire and to experience all that is happening in this process is incredibly satisfying.

Doing so does a lot, not only with the dying child itself, but also with the helpers all around.
To be able to offer support in realizing adult life’s dreams is something great.

To be able to help – and also to be allowed – in the realization of the “last wishes” of dying children is something pricelessly touching.
Here heart-breaking emotionality is combined with the best intentions and competent experience with sensitivity.

This moment of giving, this moment of unconditional help is something very personal, something very valuable for everyone involved, regardless of age, and will always remain in our memory.

To be able to help – and also to be allowed – in the realization of the “last wishes” of dying children is something pricelessly touching.
Here heart-breaking emotionality is combined with the best intentions and competent experience with sensitivity.

This moment of giving, this moment of unconditional help is something very personal, something very valuable for everyone involved, regardless of age, and will always remain in our memory.

How can YOU help?

Very simple: it starts with your decision to do it now

Helping a dying child is quite simple.
To this day, people who have open-heartedly decided to do something and participate have made their way to us on these paths:

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With your establishment of contact

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With your donation

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With your work as a volunteer

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As a “wish fairy” who finances and is also present

With your establishment of contact

With your donation

With your work as a volunteer

As a “wish fairy” who finances and is also present

With your establishment of contact

The fastest way

Send us an email: charity(at)lifedream(dot)com

Or give us a call and get in touch with us personally. We are happy to be of assistance to you: +41 56 496 85 17

With your donation

The easiest way

An amount of your choice. A small amount. A big amount. Or a medium amount.

This amount – and some trust – brings the child closer to fulfilling his or her last wish.

With your work as a volunteer

More demanding than donating, but way more emotional

In many cases, together with the family of the dying child, we cannot perform all tasks in fulfilling the wish simultaneously and everywhere.

We are dependent on volunteers, young and old, who are with us and support us in this process.

In return, we offer an incomparable experience with long memories, a huge thank you in the form of shiny children’s eyes and crocodile tears.

And, of course, a volunteer confirmation and the reimbursement of direct expenses.

As a “wish fairy” who finances and is also present

The royal road, without doubt!

Usually this is a person who has decided to take over the fulfillment of the final wish of the dying child either alone or with a „wish-fairy-partner”.
The “wish fairy” – or “wish fairy couple” comes into direct contact with the dying child after the approval of the child and his parents and thus has the unique chance to experience what donation means on the spot.

Don’t worry, we won’t leave you alone, we are always there to support you with all our experience and the irrepressible will to make it “beautiful” for the dying child.

Experiencing the power of personal decision to help and the power of heart-donated money has an incredible effect on the donor him/herself. It’s one of the most satisfying things in life waiting for you.
Not to mention the happiness of the dying child to actually have the last wish fulfilled prior to the approaching death.
Believe us, as an adult donor you will be able to take a lot with you from this child.

Unexpected. Valuables. Formative. Unforgettable.

As a “wish fairy” who finances and is also present

The royal road, without doubt!

Usually this is a person who has decided to take over the fulfillment of the final wish of the dying child either alone or with a „wish-fairy-partner”.
The “wish fairy” – or “wish fairy couple” comes into direct contact with the dying child after the approval of the child and his parents and thus has the unique chance to experience what donation means on the spot.

Don’t worry, we won’t leave you alone, we are always there to support you with all our experience and the irrepressible will to make it “beautiful” for the dying child.

Experiencing the power of personal decision to help and the power of heart-donated money has an incredible effect on the donor him/herself. It’s one of the most satisfying things in life waiting for you.
Not to mention the happiness of the dying child to actually have the last wish fulfilled prior to the approaching death.
Believe us, as an adult donor you will be able to take a lot with you from this child.

Unexpected. Valuables. Formative. Unforgettable.

Registration of a last wish
of a dying child

The first step that children’s eyes begin to shine

Are you the parents of a dying child?

Or a family member who wants to help?

Perhaps a medically working person who wants to do “something” for the dying child?

—> Then get in touch with us

Despite all the emotions involved in the fulfillment of a last wish for children, this step requires some rationality.

Don’t be offended, experience has taught us bitterly that this registration process must not be free of rules and requirements.

Here are the “principles” for registration:

How is the application to be filed?
Who can file an application?
Who can NOT file an application?
What must the application contain?
How is the application to be filed?

With this form and by email to: charity(at)lifedream(dot)com

Who can file an application?

1. the dying child, if he/she is able to do so

2. the parents of that child, of course

Who can NOT file an application?

(for legal reasons, especially when passing on medical information)

1. Family members who are not in possession of parental authority

2. Friends and acquaintances

3. Medical professionals accompanying the child

Of course all these persons can inform the parents of the child about Lifedream, or send us an email on charity(at)lifedream(dot)com, stating the contact details of the parents with a short description of the situation.
We will then contact the parents and explain the registration process to them.

What must the application contain?

1. Details of the parents and the child

2. Content and time window of the dying child’s last wish

3. Description of the medical situation indicating the estimated remaining lifetime of the child

4. Confirmation that a medical expert appointed by us can contact the treating doctor of the child

Which children’s wishes can be fulfilled?
What kind of wishes we cannot fulfill?
Where can the last wish for a child be fulfilled?
Which children’s wishes can be fulfilled?

literally anything that can be done, provided that

1. the medical situation allows this

2. it is in fact the child’s wish, and not that of its parents

What kind of wishes we cannot fulfill?

These are in particular the wishes that are connected with the medical condition of the child, e.g. a general desire to “get well” or “pay for treatment”.

We must either leave that to the doctors or to other institutions that focus on this issue.

Lifedream is dedicated to fulfilling the life’s dreams of adults and dying children.

Where can the last wish for a child be fulfilled?

literally everywhere, as long as the health of the dying child allows this and we too can and wish to travel there (see also https://lifedream.com/where-we-work/)

Once again:

Please don’t be offended that we had to make these rules. Unfortunately, experience has taught us bitterly that this registration process must not be free of rules and requirements.

Otherwise we will be hopelessly overrun and/or the abuse can no longer be excluded.

After registration via email we will contact you within a week and determine the next steps together.
We organize from A-Z everything that is needed to fulfill the wish.
You are not alone – we are here to help.
Together with you we will achieve something that cannot be bought with money:

  • a smile from a dying child
  • a moment of bliss
  • true friendship with a young person

When a child dies

A very difficult subject. That’s why we dare

Children are not supposed to die.
There’s just no place for that in our hearts.
Though the beloved child dies.

You want to help, from the bottom of your heart. You want to use your love, your care and your own lifetime to help, but you don’t know how.

You are overwhelmed by your feelings, you can no longer think clearly.

Whether you are a parent, family member, friend or caregiver, perhaps the following words can help you to transform your fears and worries into action.

First steps

You will probably first negate the fact that the child is about to die, but in time you will learn to accept this.

However, as with many others before you, you will not fully acknowledge – or have to acknowledge – reality until the beloved child has actually died.

Don’t blame yourself. That’s normal.

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Face this brutal reality!

No matter how much it hurts. Yes, that takes strength, a lot of strength. But this is the first – and immensely important – step to help the dying child
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Always be honest and sincere

The dying child will understand – and sometimes even accept – that he or she will soon die, but until that moment he or she wants to play and laugh and be near family and friends as often as possible
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Children have the right to be children

All children, whether terminally ill or not, have the right to be children and to make decisions that affect their lives. Let the child do it
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Adult reaction determines the child's reaction

A child’s incurable illness does not only affect the child itself, of course, but also everyone who loves the child emotionally.

The adult’s reaction to the situation influences the child’s reaction. So if you support adults in the immediate vicinity of the child, you also support the dying child.

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Listen. Just listen

Especially when the dying child “just wants to talk” – or his parents or siblings.

Take your time and just listen

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Create special, unforgettable moments

Help the dying child to live happily.

Ask the child what he/she (still) wants to experience.

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Accept that the child is ill, terminally ill!

At first, it’ll just be in your head. At a later date you will also accept this in your heart
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Don't forget his/her siblings

All attention and care is focused on the dying child. In this situation the siblings can feel emotionally abandoned and most probably cannot cope with the topic of death on their own.

Do not forget them, try to meet their needs for warmth, secureness and explanation

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Sometimes just be there

Prepare yourself mentally for situations where words are not enough. Then just be there. 

But clear and present and with all your care.

Donate your very personal lifetime to this situation and to the child. This is the highest good from your life that you can give.

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Support family members and close friends

Perhaps you as a caring companion of the family can be a great support and help in a practical way. Sometimes everyday things help to relieve parents, such as going shopping, doing the laundry, keeping the apartment in order or driving their siblings to school. Help by giving parents and siblings a break.
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Be with the child as often as possible

Spend a lot of time with the dying child. 

Make sure that the people who mean the most to the dying child are there as often as possible.

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Support the child's friendships

Relationships with peers are very important for children, and the disease is likely to create some social and physical barriers to their friendships.

Support these friendships to the best of your ability and organize visits to the hospital. Help these friends send messages back and forth when personal contact is not possible or no longer possible.

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Face this brutal reality!

No matter how much it hurts. Yes, that takes strength, a lot of strength. But this is the first – and immensely important – step to help the dying child
null

Accept that the child is ill, terminally ill!

At first, it’ll just be in your head. At a later date you will also accept this in your heart
null

Always be honest and sincere

The dying child will understand – and sometimes even accept – that he or she will soon die, but until that moment he or she wants to play and laugh and be near family and friends as often as possible
null

Don't forget his/her siblings

All attention and care is focused on the dying child. In this situation the siblings can feel emotionally abandoned and most probably cannot cope with the topic of death on their own.

Do not forget them, try to meet their needs for warmth, secureness and explanation

null

Children have the right to be children

All children, whether terminally ill or not, have the right to be children and to make decisions that affect their lives. Let the child do it
null

Sometimes just be there

Prepare yourself mentally for situations where words are not enough. Then just be there. 

But clear and present and with all your care.

Donate your very personal lifetime to this situation and to the child. This is the highest good from your life that you can give.

null

Adult reaction determines the child's reaction

A child’s incurable illness does not only affect the child itself, of course, but also everyone who loves the child emotionally.

The adult’s reaction to the situation influences the child’s reaction. So if you support adults in the immediate vicinity of the child, you also support the dying child.

null

Support family members and close friends

Perhaps you as a caring companion of the family can be a great support and help in a practical way. Sometimes everyday things help to relieve parents, such as going shopping, doing the laundry, keeping the apartment in order or driving their siblings to school. Help by giving parents and siblings a break.
null

Listen. Just listen

Especially when the dying child “just wants to talk” – or his parents or siblings.

Take your time and just listen

null

Be with the child as often as possible

Spend a lot of time with the dying child. 

Make sure that the people who mean the most to the dying child are there as often as possible.

null

Create special, unforgettable moments

Help the dying child to live happily.

Ask the child what he/she (still) wants to experience.

null

Support the child's friendships

Relationships with peers are very important for children, and the disease is likely to create some social and physical barriers to their friendships.

Support these friendships to the best of your ability and organize visits to the hospital. Help these friends send messages back and forth when personal contact is not possible or no longer possible.

Do not underestimate the child’s ability
to understand its situation

Children usually understand more than we think.

They deserve our respect and compassion – but above all – our sincerity.

Many adults believe that children cannot understand the issue of death or should be protected from the truth or from themselves.

Our experience with dying children shows us a completely different picture. You would be amazed at what you can learn as an adult from a dying child, provided it has the necessary time and different ways to deal with the subject and to speak openly and honestly to familiar people about it.

If you, as an adult, do not speak honestly and directly to the dying child about his prognosis – and above all with the necessary time – he/she can feel isolated and alone.

Incurable sick children are torn between the desire to find out details about their illness and the hope that they are not sick at all.

Therefore, listen carefully at the beginning of the conversation and correctly understand the feelings of the child.

Share your concerns, talk about emotions and fears, have an open and equal dialogue, do your best to support and answer all – really all – questions to the best of your knowledge and belief.

If you don’t know something, stick to it and say, “I don’t know.”

Just answer the child’s question. Do not overreact because of your own fear, even if you feel you have to.

Don’t give the dying child false hope, don’t try to “protect” him or her by lying about his or her state of health.

The discrepancy between this false hope and people’s behaviour will soon become apparent and the dying child will become confused, frustrated and perhaps even angry.

Encourage open communication, but do not force it.

The privilege to say
“Good bye”

It’s not natural for parents to outlive their children. There is nothing more difficult for families than the death of a child of one’ s own.

When the child begins to understand the severity of the disease, explain to him or her that he or she is likely to die – in a language that he or she can understand.

This is probably the hardest thing you’ve ever done!

But honest love is what the dying child needs most.

Depending on age and state of development, the child will not immediately understand what this means. It will start to think about it and ask questions.

The dying child will begin to assimilate the concept of death, to build up an understanding of time – namely the remaining time – and sometimes even to express the desire to separate from that which no longer seems important in order to care only for the essential.

Support this process, no matter how much it hurts!

Accompany your child on this last journey of farewell, in the order and speed that he or she will and should determine for himself or herself.

In most cases there is very little time left at the end and there is the possibility that the important farewell is only half done or missed completely.

Use this momentum for yourself as long as it is there and say goodbye.

This is not an easy process, take the time to deal with it.

Consider this farewell a privilege.

Don’t take it for granted!

After the funeral, you’ll be very happy to have had a real goodbye.
It will help you to cope better with grief.

Where sad children’s eyes turn to shiny rays

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